EPA Launches Updated Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator

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Electric Vehicle Air PollutionThe US EPA is the source of most air quality impact assessment models used in the US for regulatory purposes, such as predicting the potential impacts from proposed stationary sources of air pollutants and mobile sources such as motor vehicles. Since motor vehicle emissions vary with regulatory changes in required emission level, it is important that impact modeling be performed with the most up-to-date models.

EPA recently announced  that an updated version of the Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) model — MOVES2010 — is now available for use to estimate air pollution from cars, trucks, and other on-road mobile sources. The model can also calculate the emissions reduction benefits from a range of mobile source control strategies, such as inspection and maintenance programs and local fuel standards.

EPA will soon publish a Federal Register notice approving MOVES2010 for meeting official state implementation plan and transportation conformity requirements. The MOVES2010 model replaces EPA’s MOBILE6.2 emissions factor model.

Under the Clean Air Act, EPA is required to update regularly the way it calculates mobile source emissions. EPA is continuously collecting data and conducting emissions studies to assess the air quality impacts of on-road vehicles. As a result of using data collected from millions of cars and trucks gathered since MOBILE6.2 was released in 2004, MOVES2010 provides increased accuracy in emissions inventory results.

For the first time, the model can estimate emissions on a range of scales from national emissions impacts down to the impacts of individual transportation projects. Another improvement is the ability to express output as either total mass (in tons, pounds, kilograms, or grams) or as emissions factors (grams-per-mile, and in some cases, grams-per-vehicle). These changes to how EPA approaches mobile source emissions modeling are based, in part, upon recommendations made to the agency by the National Academy of Sciences.

For more information: EPA

Article by Roger Greenway, appearing courtesy of ENN

[photo credit: Simone Ramelia]

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3 Comments

  1. I wonder how this new piece of EPA approved machinery will affect the commercial automobile testing industry. While many emissions testing companies strive to reduce pollutants and keep more stringent quality control with their testing, replacing and updating testing equipment can be costly and impractical.I wonder how this new piece of EPA approved machinery will affect the commercial automobile testing industry. While many emissions testing companies strive to reduce pollutants and keep more stringent quality control with their testing, replacing and updating testing equipment can be costly and impractical. Yet, environmentally aware vehicle testing services are becoming not only expected by consumers, but demanded.

  2. Rotundo Pierluigi on

    But i think that there are many factors that that simulator cannot realistically represent…

    Rotundo Pierluigi

  3. I think Sierra Ramirez is partly right. Environmentally aware vehicle testing services are becoming not only expected by consumers, but demanded. So,I think that the Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) model — MOVES2010 will be a success in combating environmental pollution. Recently, Mercedes-Benz has also launched an advanced driving simulator. See a fantastic illustration of the model at http://clients.ccm-news.com/?client=Mercedes-Benz. Hopefully, a combination of these modern technologies would enhance the experience of pollution-free driving manifold!What do you think?

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