Dallas Gets Electric Vehicle Charging Stations

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Electric vehicles will get a power push in the Dallas region and help reduce range anxiety as NRG Energy plans to install 70 Freedom Stations in the region, adding another 50 in Houston by the end of 2012. NRG also plans to connect the Interstate 45 corridor in 2012.

The first eVgo Freedom Station is located at the Walgreens at 5201 Belt Line Road at Montfort Drive in Dallas (follow the link for a detailed map of the stations).

Each Freedom Station provides a 480 volt DC fast charger that can add 30 miles of range in only 10 minutes and a 240 volt Level 2 charger that can add up to 25 miles of range in an hour. The stations are available 24/7 and include a service tower with a mounted camera, giving customers access to an eVgo service representative or to activate a strobe light, siren and alert law enforcement, even from inside their vehicles. The eVgo network will also include convenience stations.

NRG President and CEO David Crane said that the inauguration of the station in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex “is a critical first step toward making electric vehicles the smart and convenient choice for Texans who want to reduce their cost of driving while contributing to cleaner air and America’s energy independence.”

Article by Antonio Pasolini, a Brazilian writer and video art curator based in London, UK. He holds a BA in journalism and an MA in film and television.

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Walter’s contributions to CleanTechies over the past 4 years have been instrumental in growing the publications social media channels via his ongoing editorial and data driven strategies. He is the founder and managing director of Sunflower Tax, a renewable energy tax and finance consultancy based in San Diego, California. Active in the San Diego clean technology community, participating in events sponsored by CleanTech San Diego, EcoTopics, and Cleantech Open San Diego, Walter has also been a presenter at numerous California Center for Sustainability (CCSE) programs. He currently serves as an adjunct professor at the University of San Diego School of Law where he teaches a course on energy taxation and policy.

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