Massive Solar PV Farm Opens in Germany

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A 78 MW part of a 148 MW photovoltaic solar farm was completed on September 24. The project was developed by Saferay, which is based in Berlin, while the plant occupies a former open pit mining area near Senftenberg in Eastern Germany.

According to a Global Solar Technology magazine, the 78 MW plant took three months to complete and will supply 25,000 households with electricity. It features 330,000 crystalline solar modules and 62 central inverter stations.

The plant is annexed to another 70 MW plant that shares a common infrastructure with Saferay’s plant and a 18 MW plant, which was completed last year.

Three German banks invested €150 million (US$202.5 million) in the project. “Utility scale PV projects like this one play an important role in securing Germany’s energy supply and speed up the country’s transformation to renewable energies”, said Brandenburg’s Prime Minister Matthias Platzeck.

Saferay states on its website that its mission is “to generate solar PV power at competitive price levels without subsidies or feed-in tariffs, and accelerate the exit from fossil or nuclear energy.”

The company said the project shows how fast large-scale photovoltaic systems can be built and despite being located in a place that is not always sunny it can generate cheaper power than wind.

Saferay also stressed its concerns with preserving habitat around the farm and took care to leave large areas of land between installations so that birds and other animals would not be affected.

Article by Antonio Pasolini, a Brazilian writer and video art curator based in London, UK. He holds a BA in journalism and an MA in film and television.

About Author

Walter’s contributions to CleanTechies over the past 4 years have been instrumental in growing the publications social media channels via his ongoing editorial and data driven strategies. He is the founder and managing director of Sunflower Tax, a renewable energy tax and finance consultancy based in San Diego, California. Active in the San Diego clean technology community, participating in events sponsored by CleanTech San Diego, EcoTopics, and Cleantech Open San Diego, Walter has also been a presenter at numerous California Center for Sustainability (CCSE) programs. He currently serves as an adjunct professor at the University of San Diego School of Law where he teaches a course on energy taxation and policy.

1 Comment

  1. I don’t want to sound like I am bashing solar as I am huge advocate of this energy source, but a 78 MW – or even a 148 MW – plant is massive. A single coal / gas / nuclear plant can bring up to a gigawatt.

    However, congrats on installing so many solar panels in three little months :)

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