Niagara Hydropower Project Reaches New Milestone

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The Niagara Tunnel Project in Ontario, Canada has reached a significant milestone with half of the tunnel now fully lined with concrete.

When it is finished, the smooth concrete lining will ensure the efficient and uninterrupted flow of Niagara River water through this 10.2 km tunnel to the Sir Adam Beck generating stations for the next 100 years. Digging the tunnel using the largest hard-rock boring machine in the world, dubbed “Big Becky,” was completed last spring.

The Niagara Tunnel is one of the largest hydropower projects in the world and will supply enough clean, renewable electricity to power 160,000 homes when it goes online in 2013. It currently employs more than 400 people and it is estimated it will bring $1 billion in economic benefits to the region.

“The Niagara Tunnel Project is an example of how the province is transforming Ontario’s electricity system and investing in the clean energy economy. We are ensuring a clean, modern, reliable and affordable energy system that will power us today, and for generations to come,” said Chris Bentle, Minister of Energy.

Ontario has been investing heavily in hydropower. Since 2003, more than 100 megawatts of new and refurbished waterpower projects have come online in the region. That’s enough to power 50,000 homes.

Article by Antonio Pasolini, a Brazilian writer and video art curator based in London, UK. He holds a BA in journalism and an MA in film and television.

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Walter’s contributions to CleanTechies over the past 4 years have been instrumental in growing the publications social media channels via his ongoing editorial and data driven strategies. He is the founder and managing director of Sunflower Tax, a renewable energy tax and finance consultancy based in San Diego, California. Active in the San Diego clean technology community, participating in events sponsored by CleanTech San Diego, EcoTopics, and Cleantech Open San Diego, Walter has also been a presenter at numerous California Center for Sustainability (CCSE) programs. He currently serves as an adjunct professor at the University of San Diego School of Law where he teaches a course on energy taxation and policy.

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