UK Government Launches Wave Energy Funding Scheme

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Organizations working with wave energy will be able to bid for a share of the £20 million kitty ((US$31.6 million) that the government launched yesterday.

The project is called Marine Energy Array Demonstrator (MEAD) and it will support two pre-commercial projects to showcase the operation of wave and/or tidal devices in an array formation.

Eligibility criteria includes the ability to generate a minimum of 7 GWh per year and the use of at least three generating devices, previously demonstrated at full scale in sea conditions. Projects must be up and running by the end of March 2016.

“This scheme will take us one vital step closer to realizing our ambitions of generating electricity from the waves and tides, powering homes and businesses across the whole of the UK with clean, green electricity,” said Energy and Climate Change minister Greg Barker.

The MEAD funding is part of the UK government’s £200 million development fund for low carbon technologies and will run in parallel to a series of similar funding schemes for early stage marine energy projects operated by other agencies, such as the Technology Strategy Board (TSB) and the Energy Technologies Institute (ETI).

Article by Antonio Pasolini, a Brazilian writer and video art curator based in London, UK. He holds a BA in journalism and an MA in film and television.

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Walter’s contributions to CleanTechies over the past 4 years have been instrumental in growing the publications social media channels via his ongoing editorial and data driven strategies. He is the founder and managing director of Sunflower Tax, a renewable energy tax and finance consultancy based in San Diego, California. Active in the San Diego clean technology community, participating in events sponsored by CleanTech San Diego, EcoTopics, and Cleantech Open San Diego, Walter has also been a presenter at numerous California Center for Sustainability (CCSE) programs. He currently serves as an adjunct professor at the University of San Diego School of Law where he teaches a course on energy taxation and policy.

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