The Most Exciting Developments in Green Investing for 2012

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The past ten years have seen major changes in the types of technologies that are used to produce and consume energy. As dwindling oil reserves place greater strain on energy markets, the green energy revolution is likely to accelerate. This is not simply reserved to your typical alternative energy industries such as wind and solar, but is expanding to reach a variety of other industries.

Green Appliance Retrofitting

One of the biggest developments in the green energy sector has been the growing demand for green appliance retrofitting and energy management services. Energy management services allow homeowners to control how much energy they use.

Homeowners are trying to cut energy costs in the long-run while also owning homes that have a smaller environmental footprint. Newer appliances are engineered while following more strict standards than older appliances and many homeowners are choosing to replace their older appliances, such as HVAC units and the refrigerator, with newer units. Businesses are mostly replacing their older appliances to cut down on business costs.

Selling Waste

Waste products, such as paper and aluminum, have been recycled and reused for decades. However, there are some waste materials that cannot be practically recycled in the same way as aluminum. Fortunately, several companies are developing technologies that make it easier to transform waste products into fuel without the toxic effects.

Storing Green Energy

Many forms of energy are not consistent. For example, solar power is not as effective on cloudy days and during the winter. However, several engineers are working hard to develop more efficient methods of storingrenewable energysources such as wind power and hydro-power. By doing so, it is possible to generate surplus energy that is later harnessed.

The Most Developed Economies are Leading the Charge

The Global Trends in Renewable Energy Investment Report has found that developed economies invest more in green technologies than developing countries. The total number of investments throughout the world has increased by 17% in 2011. That is $257 billion in green technology investments.

Not only are renewable energy investments on the rise in recent years, but innovation in a variety of industries are helping homeowners and businesses use this energy more efficiently. Even the health care industry, buoyed by educational facilities like the Sanford Brown Institute, has begun to revolutionize its need for paper and e-waste by investing in new medical billing and coding technologies.

Solar Panels are Becoming More Affordable

One of the most exciting developments in green energy is the falling prices of solar panels. It is now possible for many homeowners to install solar panels on their roofs so that they can cut energy costs or even generate an energy surplus. Many homeowners are selling energy back to their utility companies.

Best Resources for Green Investments

One of best resources for information on green investments is the Nasdaq.com website. Besides providing statistics on market activity in the green sector, Nasdaq.com also provides regular articles on the best green investments. Another worthwhile resource to take advantage of is the Green Money Journal.

Article by Amanda Green, a guest blogger that has written extensively on the subject of technology and business.

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About Author

Walter’s contributions to CleanTechies over the past 4 years have been instrumental in growing the publications social media channels via his ongoing editorial and data driven strategies. He is the founder and managing director of Sunflower Tax, a renewable energy tax and finance consultancy based in San Diego, California. Active in the San Diego clean technology community, participating in events sponsored by CleanTech San Diego, EcoTopics, and Cleantech Open San Diego, Walter has also been a presenter at numerous California Center for Sustainability (CCSE) programs. He currently serves as an adjunct professor at the University of San Diego School of Law where he teaches a course on energy taxation and policy.

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