French People and Business Leaders Support Energy Transition

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According to a Harris poll carried out for the European Climate Foundation and the French Economic, Social Affairs and Environment Council (CESE), over 80 percent of French people and business leaders are supporting the energy transition.

This energy transition is due to allow our civilization to go from polluting fossil fuels to cleaner and greener energy sources such as renewable energy. A significant part of this transition will be played by energy efficiency.

Seen as a way to bring technological innovation, access to new markets and as a way to increase the attractiveness of French companies overall, the majority of citizens and of entrepreneurs believe that the transition will have positive impacts on their lives.

The quasi totality of the polled people see this transition as a good thing for reducing pollution, preserving natural resources and fighting climate change.

Even if short term price increases are foreseen by more than three quarters of polled people, only a third see it as expensive in the long term. As a matter of fact, 43% of the French public believes energy will ultimately be cheaper.

As a result over 80 percent of respondents believe it is somewhat or very urgent to lead an energy transition policy. Similarly over 90 percent are in favor of renewable energy sources.

Nuclear power, while bringing 80 percent of French electricity, is dividing the population with around half in favor and half against.

As both the two main French newspapers – Le Monde and Le Figaro – note, the poll shows that less than a third of French people and less than a quarter of French business leaders believe that shale gas is compatible with this energy transition.

It is worth noting that the previous conservative government led by Mr. Sarkozy had banned fracking as early as 2011. The current liberal government, led by Mr. Hollande, has reaffirmed that it won’t ease the ban as Bloomberg reported.

More on this most interesting poll on the European Climate Foundation page.

About Author

Fascinated by sustainability and cleantech since 2004, Edouard wrote both his Bachelor of Arts' dissertation and Master's thesis on sustainable energy topics. He haven't stopped writing on these subjects ever since. A French Master's graduate in international management, Edouard has had several experiences in Marketing and Communications in Europe. He worked for firms as diverse as a German water treatment company, a leading French business school and lately a Belgian automation specialist. He is currently for hire globally. Since 2007 Edouard has been selecting for his own blog the latest headlines and best researches on sustainable development, climate change, cleantech and the world energy sector. With over 1,600 published articles, he is read all over the world. On Cleantechies, Edouard has been proposing since June 2009 news articles and opinion pieces on on French and European policies. Don't hesitate to contact him as he is always interested in discussing with new people.

  • Smith Matthew

    Interesting article! Thanks a lot! I do believe that a energy transition and sustainable development within the next decades is highly important for France. We’re currently seeing the trend ob urbanization, so sustainable development is a important part of a energy transition. Siemens, for instance, have announced that they are seeing a great potential in South African cities: http://www.siemens.co.za/sustainable-development/ There are a variety of things that need to be tackled, such as a more sustainable infrastructure, a more sustainable energy supply, more sustainable building technologies,…

    It’s going to be very tough but highly interesting years!

    • http://www.edouardstenger.com Edouard Stenger

      Many thanks for your comment.

      I totally agree that this is going to be a very interesting period with a lot of work. I consider myself lucky to be around the start of my career and to possibly be able to do it in cleantech and sustainability.

      Literally everything has to be reinvented… Yes, we are going to be busy in the next four decades if we are serious at decarbonizing France and the entire world.