Tag: enzymes


Previous posts, e.g., here and here, discussed the patent infringement litigation between Danish biopharm rivals Novozymes and Danisco (now owned by DuPont), which are both active in developing enzymes used in the production of biofuels. In the suit, Novozymes accused Read more…


A team of genetic engineers reports it has developed an inexpensive process that uses fungus to convert raw materials such as straw and sawdust into a productive biofuel. While it was previously known that the Trichoderma fungus produces the enzymes Read more…


A previous post reported on a declaratory judgment action brought by DuPont-owned biopharmaceutical company Danisco against Novozymes. The two companies are both Danish and appear to be arch rivals. As the court described it, they are “reputedly the two major Read more…


Researchers at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) have made a discovery that could increase the production of ethanol and lower its costs. They say they have pinpointed the gene that controls ethanol production capacity in a


In a previous post, I wrote about a patent infringement suit between Danish biopharm rivals Novozymes and Danisco, which are both active in developing enzymes used in production of biofuels. In the suit, Novozymes has accused Danisco of infringing U.S. Read more…


U.S. researchers have used a combination of enzymes that consume cellulose from non-food products to produce a high-quality hydrogen gas, a potential breakthrough in efforts to use biofuels to power hydrogen fuel cells. Scientists at Virginia Polytechnic Institute, the Oak Read more…


One of the biggest challenges for biofuels is to find ways to break down cellulosic biomass and convert it into ethanol. These are the cell walls of plants, which contain sugars that can become fuel without competing with food crops. Read more…


One of the major concerns regarding biofuels is the competition with food stocks due to concerns of diversion of plants such as maize, sugar cane, rapeseed etc to make fuel. Second generation biofuels are greener as they can be made Read more…

Skip to toolbar